October 24th

TAKE BACK YOUR TIME DAY

Take Back Your Time Day was celebrated on Saturday, October 24, 2015. Community celebrations took place across the U.S. People from all types of professions and students across campuses joined to celebrate the day and reflect on the importance of the Take Back Your Time movement. Please continue to spread our message on Social Media by using #takebackyourtime2gether and #takebackyourtime.

We had three main themes for TBYT Day.

More Vacation Time!

Making sure Americans get more vacation time and actually take it is one of our priorities. Here's what you can do.

Parks

Celebrate our national, state and local parks for Take Back Your Time Day! 2016 is the 100th anniversary of the founding of America's National Park Service. The acclaimed writer Wallace Stegner has called it "America's best idea."

Millions of Americans visit these parks each year, but their visits are getting shorter–4 hours in Yosemite, 2 at the Grand Canyon, etc.–because they don't have enough vacation time. Parks are democratic; they allow all of us to enjoy leisure and healthful recreation. In the next year, create ways to celebrate your parks, not just the National Parks, but also your state parks and local parks. Point out that John Muir, the so-called "Father of the National Park system" also was the first American to call for a paid vacation law, back in 1876. "We work too much and rest too little," he said.

Food

October 24th is now also World Food Day (it used to be October 16). In your community, there are probably lots of people, especially young people, who are interested in local food and growing their own food and eating healthily.

There may even be a Slow Food organization. Talk with them about how people need time to eat right, choose local and healthy foods–fast foods are a reaction to harried lifestyles–and grow some of their own.

Your Ideas

You don't have to stick with our themes. If you have other ideas, be sure to implement them. The important thing is that lots of communities hold and publicize events so that our message becomes more visible.

Publicity

Be sure to let the media know what you are doing. Put up a local Web page and ask local organizations–health, recreation, food, family, faith, labor, academic, travel, etc.-- to publicize your event or theme on theirs.

Write a press release and send it to your local newspaper and radio and TV stations. Write an op-ed about vacation time or time for parks or time for food for your local paper and send it to them with enough time for them to consider running it.

And let us know what you're planning and doing–Please!